What you need to know before ordering replacement cabinet doors

A few minutes can prevent mistakes in ordering the wrong cabinet doors for your kitchen remodeling project.

#1. Avoid measuring errors.
When you order cabinet doors or drawer fronts be aware that the size you order will be the size you receive.
Because different hinge choices no longer allow for a consistent rule-of-thumb that adds some constant size increase to the cabinet opening size, the buyer needs to order the exact size door required by the hinge design. Different hinges will have different overlay requirements.
If you are ordering hinges along with the doors, the door manufacturer will be able to assist with the door sizing because of his familiarity with the hinges he carries.

#2. You likely have a good idea of the finished look you are after, so you are ready for the “appearance” decisions.
The first decision is between the two major door styles, Cope & Stick and Mitered.
Cope and Stick, or traditional cabinet doors, are the most common and come in square, arched, and double arched styles.
Examples of Cope & Stick doors can be seen here.
Mitered doors are all square but, because of the joining method, allow for an almost unlimited number or frame pattern designs.
Examples of Mitered doors can be seen here.

#3. Also contributing to the overall look of your cabinet doors will be the wood type they are made of.
If you are seeking a painted look, order your new doors in Paint-Grade. Paint Grade doors usually have the frames made from Poplar, Alder, or Maple, and the panels made from MDF (Medium Density Fiberboard) or a solid wood like Poplar, Alder, or Maple.
MDF is preferred because it does not react dimensionally to changes in humidity like solid woods.
If you are looking for cabinet doors that can be stained or lacquered and have the look of finished wood, you can choose between almost any wood type. The most popular being Oak, Alder, Maple, Hickory, Birch, Cherry, and Pine. Cabinet doors are also made from these woods with knotty included for a rustic look.
Examples of several woods can be seen here.

There are several sources for new cabinet doors.
Retail outlets like Home Depot and hardware chains have a selection of doors.
These retail outlets tend to have higher prices mainly due to the expense of inventory and salaried sales people.
Another source, made possible by the internet, is factory-direct from the manufacturer.
Manufacturer websites offer several advantages over retail outlets.
The first advantage is price; expect to save 25% to 40% by buying direct.
The second advantage is time of delivery; with no middlemen or distribution warehouses between you and the factory, you will receive your order on about 2-weeks instead of 4-to-6 weeks.
The third advantage in buying factory direst is the selection. While retail stores are limited in what they can stock by space and inventory cost, the manufactured builds each order as it is received.
You are not limited to ordering only the doors the retail chain carries, when buying factory-direct, you can order any door style, not just the styles in the stores catalog.

Keep in mind, the factory that you order from online is often the same factory that the retail chain also orders from.

So if you are likely to be receiving the same cabinet doors, why not order factory direct and choose from a much larger selection, at a 30% lower price, and receive your order in half the time?

Visit the CabinetDoors.Com website and browse the manufacturer with the largest selection on the web.